First Day of Unemployment

Here’s how it happened:

I knew months ago that it was coming to this. I’d gotten a transfer from a small branch to a more busy location last November and thought I was escaping what had become a miserable living,but little did I know I was jumping out of the frying pan and into the fire. It seemed my (now ex-)manager always had one person to pick on. And I was that person.

There was not a thing I could do right. And not to sound snotty (as I’m perfectly aware I was no perfect employee), but I was pretty good at my job. Civil service suited me well and I’m good with the public. My manager, on the other hand, was not. There is a line of work meant for her somewhere, but working with the public is not her thing. She regularly approached patrons with absolute sass, pointed looks, and once (not kidding) I saw her raise her palm to someone’s face so they would be quiet.

Imagine how she could be to her employees if she was like that to patrons. Now imagine how terrible it would be to be her particular favorite. For months I said nothing. It wasn’t until the beginning of this past summer that a coworker finally whispered to me, “How do you smile through it?”

It wasn’t just me. I wasn’t being overly sensitive (having anxiety I tell myself often the problem is me). Someone else had seen. No matter how much I tried to pretend it wasn’t happening, I couldn’t keep my manager from her own actions. By the end of the summer the rest of my coworkers (seven in my building, one sub) had made comments to me. They wanted to know how I kept my mouth shut, they begged me to go to HR, they wondered why she was so verbal with me and not the others.

At this point, I had been taking my lunches in my car so I could cry. I would be on my drive home from work and already anxious to go in the next day. Even at home I stopped leaving my bedroom because I couldn’t concentrate on anything anyway, not even a small conversation. I lived for my days off which slowly become just as bad because my homework was slipping and those were catch-up days.

July 19th was the day it was decided. I sat in my car on lunch, chain-smoking and trying not to cry from the latest snide comment. I was done. Completely and totally done. I pulled the notebook from my purse and started running the numbers. If I cancelled my gym membership (which, let’s be honest, was not being used) and paid off my credit cards, it was doable…if I quit smoking. Cigarettes made up a big portion of my budget (roughly $200 a month). Let me put it this way so you understand how desperate I was feeling – I started smoking young and had smoked a pack a day for ten years…and it was no question. I called the quit line (1-800-QUIT-NOW, it’s free) right then, while on my lunch. It was settled – they would provide patches and I was quitting the following Tuesday.

The coaching sessions with the quit line were quite candid. No, I was not quitting for health. I was quitting so I could quit my job. I really think that was all that got me through it. As of today, I’m on day 73 tobacco-free.

Everything went great for three weeks until my piece of garbage car bit the dust and, ta-da, I had to finance a new one. Slight damper in my plans. But I would not be discouraged…I was getting the hell out of my job. I reworked my finances and got it to a manageable balance. I live and eat at home and get enough money on the side to pay for my car and Netflix, so I’m golden. There’s not going to be any eating out, but I’ve got a safe car, instant show streaming, and still able to quit my job.

So, I did. Yesterday was my last day and, honestly, I don’t think I’ll regret it. I’ve got money to last me through May, so right now I plan on taking a few weeks off to just veg out and realign my life. I plan on participating in NaNoWriMo this year and having two books of a new series finished by the year’s end, so I can throw them up on Kindle Direct and hopefully bring in a little more pocket money.

There is also the option of going on to get my MA next fall, but that’s for another post and another huge issue (debt).

So that’s my background. That’s a large reason why I had a minor meltdown and left my job. I don’t plan on many posts being this lengthy, but the first few will probably be to build a foundation. God, I don’t even know if anyone will read any of this, but if you do – thank you. Thanks for taking the time to read, I’ll try my best to be worthy of your time.

Dee

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “First Day of Unemployment”

  1. Stay tobacco-free, keep up your hobbies (gym, church, volunteer) to get you out of the house and interacting with people and networking. Something will come along, trust me. We have all been there, and I know the feeling, but this can be a chance to re-invent yourself. You don’t have to look for a job “tomorrow” but you can take some time to think and rediscover your path.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s